Posts Tagged ‘Mark Anthony Myrie’


I recently read an article in Loop Jamaica, which was written by Karyl Walker, a journalist who is accredited, supposedly, for previously working with two or three renowned media houses in Jamaica.

Mr. Walker’s writing was in criticism and opposition to Member of Parliament and Health Minister, Christopher Tufton, who apparently believes that former convict and famed reggae artiste, Buju Banton, owes the Jamaican people some explanation regarding his arrest, charges and finding of guilt in the United States of America, before being deported back to Jamaica in late 2018.

As much as I am a long-standing fan of Buju Banton and could care less about his explanation, personally, I must disagree with the journalist for defending Buju Banton’s muted stance on the matter surrounding his deportation.

Unfortunately, a celebrity status tends to draw similar attention and responsibility as all other public figures.

Buju Banton, whose real name is Mark Myrie, rose to fame on the support of people, who bought into the words of his music, whether it was “Boom bye-bye” or “It’s not an easy road”, people were led by the artiste throughout or during one of his two career phases.

In his heydays, Buju Banton sang about subjects such as “Batty Rider”, while leaning toward one area of the Jamaican culture and received full support from Jamaica, for his music, before crossing over to what was viewed as a sign of maturity and growth when he embraced Rastafarian and began portraying himself as a conscious and righteous individual in music.

Buju Banton took on a role as Shepherd, leading a flock out of darkness into a light, his lyrics were enlightenment to the dull and the ignorant as he philosophized, in music, under the light of a noble messenger.

Considering these facts, it is clear, in my opinion, whether Buju Banton owes the Jamaican people an explanation about his incarceration.

Of course, he does. He is a celebrity, he is a public figure, he chose to be a servant to the people.

People wants to know whether or not he was framed and sent to prison, falsely, under the US famed monotonous cycle of locking up innocent people or whether he had misled his fans into believing that he was a truly converted and righteous Rastafarian.

It is clear that if he has deceived the people with his image and music, he faces the loss of his fan base, but of no consolation, Buju Banton would not be the first celebrity to fall from grace, shamefully; either way, in respect of his audience, he should not remain mute on the matter.

© Ian T. Sebàs 2019

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