Posts Tagged ‘Jamaica’

Damion Crawford (Politician, Jamaica)

Art by Tina Sebàs

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The Hon. Andrew Holness of Jamaica

Art by Tina Sebàs


Let’s talk about Jamaica or better yet, “Mek we talk bout Jamaica!”

As known to the world, Jamaica is one of Earth’s most beautiful countries, as far as landscape goes, and could be discussed to amazed adventurers and Bucket List tourists, in more than a million ways. And it is true, no photoshop edits and no hidden disclaimers are to its advertised beauty; Jamaica is simply a natural beautiful place.

But Jamaica is equally ugly among its inhabitants. This beautiful gem has been suffering for years from the gridlock of corruption.

For a Country, which is one of the world’s most desired and go-to tourist destinations, raking in millions of dollars annually, most of its residing residents continue to live below poverty line, resulting in frustration, aggression and an often render to crime and violence as solutions.

Still, this ugly nature within the island has never been successful in dimming the light of beauty which this country is made up of.

Warmth, kindness and friendly smiles remain unmoved from the faces of the majority; Jamaicans, who are proud to call this island, “The Land of My Birth” or simply “home”.

Let’s talk about Jamaica, its history, its current affairs, its culture, its changes. Mek We Talk Bout Jamaica, because a fi we place, whether we are there or temporarily living abroad. Let’s discuss every little issue as means of making our opinions heard as an influence of direction. Mek We Talk Bout Jamaica to show that we care. It’s simple: I talk about an issue, you agree or disagree, comment to start a reasoning because each one, teach one. And don’t forget to subscribe.

© Ian T. Sebàs 2019


I recently read an article in Loop Jamaica, which was written by Karyl Walker, a journalist who is accredited, supposedly, for previously working with two or three renowned media houses in Jamaica.

Mr. Walker’s writing was in criticism and opposition to Member of Parliament and Health Minister, Christopher Tufton, who apparently believes that former convict and famed reggae artiste, Buju Banton, owes the Jamaican people some explanation regarding his arrest, charges and finding of guilt in the United States of America, before being deported back to Jamaica in late 2018.

As much as I am a long-standing fan of Buju Banton and could care less about his explanation, personally, I must disagree with the journalist for defending Buju Banton’s muted stance on the matter surrounding his deportation.

Unfortunately, a celebrity status tends to draw similar attention and responsibility as all other public figures.

Buju Banton, whose real name is Mark Myrie, rose to fame on the support of people, who bought into the words of his music, whether it was “Boom bye-bye” or “It’s not an easy road”, people were led by the artiste throughout or during one of his two career phases.

In his heydays, Buju Banton sang about subjects such as “Batty Rider”, while leaning toward one area of the Jamaican culture and received full support from Jamaica, for his music, before crossing over to what was viewed as a sign of maturity and growth when he embraced Rastafarian and began portraying himself as a conscious and righteous individual in music.

Buju Banton took on a role as Shepherd, leading a flock out of darkness into a light, his lyrics were enlightenment to the dull and the ignorant as he philosophized, in music, under the light of a noble messenger.

Considering these facts, it is clear, in my opinion, whether Buju Banton owes the Jamaican people an explanation about his incarceration.

Of course, he does. He is a celebrity, he is a public figure, he chose to be a servant to the people.

People wants to know whether or not he was framed and sent to prison, falsely, under the US famed monotonous cycle of locking up innocent people or whether he had misled his fans into believing that he was a truly converted and righteous Rastafarian.

It is clear that if he has deceived the people with his image and music, he faces the loss of his fan base, but of no consolation, Buju Banton would not be the first celebrity to fall from grace, shamefully; either way, in respect of his audience, he should not remain mute on the matter.

© Ian T. Sebàs 2019

The unforeseen circumstances of severe weather conditions across Europe caused us to stay at the Highwayman Hotel in Dunstable, England.

It was not a personal choice, but a free accommodation, offered as compensation, by our airline, for having to cancel our flight at London Luton Airport.

My family and I checked in at night and could not see much of the building’s feature, but it was clearly a pub (public house) at the front and a separate building at its rear, serving as the hotel.

Despite our late arrival, we had a speedy check-in.

The reception area is very small, with an estimated maximum capacity holding of maybe four people at any one time; it is usually unmanned, so arriving guests must use the available phone to. dial 209 or 206 for assistance .

The hotel is fairly lit and appears clean; it is a typical British Bed and Breakfast type of set-up, and not a hotel per se.  If it was left up to us, we would not have stayed at the Highwayman Hotel.

We were given room No. 66, a family room, which is comprised of carpeted floors, one double bed plus a single bed, bedside tables, a flatscreen television, a desk, two chairs, a coffee table, a wardrobe and a small service station for making tea and coffee (two cups, a kettle, sugars, tea, milk, coffee etc.); the room has adequate amount of mirrors.

However; the furniture is outdated more than 30 years, but in good condition.

If you desire modern, this is not the place for you.

Additionally, it’s roomy,  the temperature was satisfactory, hot and cold water were available and towels were enough.

Access to the room is by a card, which is received at the reception desk.

Staff are neither friendly nor unfriendly.

Negative Pointers

The room does not have a fresh scent (smells of musk and mold)

The kettle is overwhelmed with limescale (recommend: Do Not Use)

The shower has mold (extremely visible)

Shower gel is not available at the Highwayman Hotel

Some room lightings did not work

Headboards are scratched

The Highwayman, in my opinion, cannot be ranked in stars because it is below average; however, it can satisfy an emergency need of a place to stay.

© Ian T. Sebàs 2018

“Sold to the highest bidder!” is usually what’s heard at auctions, after a number of proposed bids have been crushed by he, who is willing to pay the most.

It has always been rumored that the government of Jamaica is a “sellout”; despite which party is in power, the term “sellout” is usually invisibly affixed among the other fancy initials, which follow the names of politicians.

The Jamaican people are saying that, those in charge, are currently offering the Country for sale.

But the last time I checked, Jamaica was a democratic country, and whether it is being ran by the Jamaica Labor Party or the People’s National Party, democracy is its consistent statue.

In recent times, with the aid of social sites, Jamaicans have been airing their opinions online via blogs and vlogs, an obvious exercise of their democratic right, freedom of expression.

Still, most of these expressions are mere comments on suspicion that Jamaica’s Members of Parliament are making deals with outsiders, selling lands and rights for cash, without given notice to or consent from the Jamaican citizens.

A Suh It Guh!

Usually, these commentators and moaners are only seeking a ‘like’ to their published comment, online, or an echo in its favor; therefore, the Jamaican Government is never threatened or moved by these publications, which are often closed with, “A suh it guh”.

Ignorance Is No Excuse

Jamaica, like all other democratic States in the world, is governed by law, and in every Country, including Jamaica, ignorance of the law is never an excuse.

Jamaicans are often heard saying, “Mi nevva did kno dat.”(“I was not aware of that.”)

It is clear that the citizens, who refers to the Government as ‘those in charge’ do not understand their democratic rights and powers as citizens.

Fact is, there are a vast number of Jamaicans, who do not know or understand the constitution of the country, a fault of their own. And as long as they remain ignorant, those who know that they are unaware of their rights as citizens, will forever take advantage.

A common practice, seen by most Jamaicans, is giving treatment to representatives of their constituencies as if they (the representatives) are doing them (the citizens) favors, while being oblivious to the fact that the Member of Parliament works for them, and at any given time, they (the citizens) can petition for change.

If Jamaica is in fact being sold to the highest bidder, it is being sold by all Jamaicans, living in Jamaica, and not only by the Country’s government members; lastly, the sadness of this speculation being real, would be that the profits from a sold country, belonging to an approximate six million people, worldwide, would be going into the pockets of less than one hundred.

© Ian T. Sebàs 2018

© Ian T. Sebàs